Preventing and treating HIV/AIDS in poor countries will help deliver better health services through 2005 and beyond


The health systems platform: affordable medicines, better information

Ensuring people can afford medicines, including HIV/AIDS treatment, is critical. While HIV/AIDS treatment has fallen in price to 178.00 Canadian dollars (140 US dollars) per year, this is still too expensive for people living on one or two dollars per day. Even when drugs are free of cost, people often have to pay for tests, consultations and hospital care. Evidence suggests that in Africa about ten million people face impoverishment and 27 million face severe financial hardship due to the costs of health care. To help deal with this, as an example, WHO and the International Labour Organization (ILO) are working with the Government of Kenya in an ambitious scheme to develop social health insurance for the entire population.

Ensuring people can afford medicines, including HIV/AIDS treatment, is critical. While HIV/AIDS treatment has fallen in price to 178.00 Canadian dollars (140 US dollars) per year, this is still too expensive for people living on one or two dollars per day. Even when drugs are free of cost, people often have to pay for tests, consultations and hospital care. Evidence suggests that in Africa about ten million people face impoverishment and 27 million face severe financial hardship due to the costs of health care. To help deal with this, as an example, WHO and the International Labour Organization (ILO) are working with the Government of Kenya in an ambitious scheme to develop social health insurance for the entire population.


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