Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Economic evaluation of delivering Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine in routine immunization services in Kenya

Angela Oloo Akumu, Mike English, J Anthony G Scott, Ulla K Griffiths

Volume 85, Number 7, July 2007, 511-518

Table 3. Estimated annual cost (US$) of vaccines and injection equipment in Kenyan public health sector with and without the pentavalent vaccine (2004)

Antigen Doseper vial Wastage (%) Costs per dose (including freight) No. of children reached Total vaccine costs Injection supply costsa Total % of total
Bacille Calmette–Guérin 20 70 0.10 1 150 140 372 645 86 133 458 778 3.2%
DTP+hep B+Hib (pentavalent) 2 15 3.70 965 060 12 618 727 305 519 12 924 246 89.6%
Measles 10 65 0.17 900 820 150 329 70 815 221 144 1.5%
Oral polio vaccine 20 10 0.11 965 060 468 118 468 118 3.2%
Tetanus toxoid 20 15 0.03 926 914 179 603 137 831 317 434 2.2%
Yellow fever 10 65 0.82 15 871 37 366 1 248 38 614 0.3%
Total costs with pentavalent vaccine 13 826 789 601 545 14 428 334 100%
DTP+hep B combination vaccine 10 35 1.23 965 060 5 497 279 210 468 5 707 747
Total costs with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-hep B instead of pentavalent vaccine 6 705 340 506 495 7 211 835
Incremental costs of pentavalent vaccine compared with DTP+hep B 7 121 448 95 050 7 216 499

DTP, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis; hep B, hepatitis B; Hib, Haemophilus influenzae type b.a Injection supply costs consist of auto-disable syringes, reconstitution syringes and safety boxes.

[an error occurred while processing this directive]