Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Male circumcision for HIV prevention: a prospective study of complications in clinical and traditional settings in Bungoma, Kenya

Robert C Bailey, Omar Egesah, Stephanie Rosenberg

Volume 86, Number 9, September 2008, 669-677

Table 2. Practices and adverse events directly observed from medical and traditional circumcisions performed in Bungoma district, Kenya, July–August, 2004

Description of event Medical(N = 12)
Traditional(N = 12)
(n) (%) (n) (%)
Use of general anaesthesia 2 17 0 0
Use of local anaesthesia 10 83 0 0
Sutures used 9 75 0 0
Sutures widely spaced with oedema 5 56 n/a n/a
Sutures broken 5 56 n/a n/a
Infection requiring antibiotics 6 50 5 42
Wound not healed at 30 days 12 100 12 100
Torsion 2 17 0 0
Profuse bleeding requiring IV fluids 1 8 0 0
Incomplete foreskin removed 2 17 5 42
Required recircumcision 2 17 4 33
Wound > 3 cm corona to cut line 3 25 4 33
Jagged cut line/skin not uniform 2 17 3 25
Haematoma requiring surgery 1 8 0 0
No sensitivity corona to cut line 4 33 3 25
Loss of erectile function at 3 months 0 0 3 25
Required hospitalization 1 8 0 0
Permanent adverse sequelaea 3 25 4 33
No adverse event 1 8 2 16

n/a, not applicable.a Any event directly related to circumcision that results in a disability likely to last for years or a lifetime, including torsion, mutilation of the glans, excessive scarring causing loss of penile sensitivity, and erectile dysfunction.

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