Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Male circumcision for HIV prevention: a prospective study of complications in clinical and traditional settings in Bungoma, Kenya

Robert C Bailey, Omar Egesah, Stephanie Rosenberg

Volume 86, Number 9, September 2008, 669-677

Table 3. Results of penile examinations of 298 males circumcised by traditional and medical practitioners in Bungoma district, Kenya, 45–89 days post circumcision

Results Traditional
Medical
Adjusted ORa 95% CI P-value
(n) (%) (n) (%)
Fully healed
Yes 136 78.6 112 89.6 0.43 0.22–0.84 0.014
No 37 21.4 13 10.4
Crust still present
Yes 20 11.6 8 6.4 1.91 0.81–4.49 0.137
No 153 88.4 117 93.6
Wound still open
Yes 3 1.7 2 1.6 1.09 0.18–6.59 0.929
No 170 98.3 123 98.4
Excessive foreskin remaining
Yes 20 11.6 3 2.4 5.32 1.54–18.31 0.008
No 153 88.4 122 97.6
Signs of infection
Yes 0 0 1 0.8
No 173 100 124 99.2
Swelling
Yes 24 13.9 6 4.8 3.20 1.27–8.07 0.014
No 149 86.1 119 95.2
Lacerations
Yes 29 16.9 12 9.6 1.91 0.93–3.91 0.077
No 143 83.1 113 90.4
Keloid scarring
Yes 30 17.4 12 9.6 1.99 0.98–4.06 0.059
No 142 82.6 113 90.4

CI, confidence interval; OR, odds ratio.a Odds ratios are adjusted for age, rural versus urban residence, and number of days since circumcision.

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