Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Print media reporting of male circumcision for preventing HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa

Alberta L Wang, William Duke & George P Schmid

Volume 87, Number 8, August 2009, 595-603

Table 2. Coverage and accuracy of key messages on male circumcision for preventing HIV infection in men in sub-Saharan Africa, as found in unique print media articles (n = 219) from 28 March 2007 to 30 June 2008

Messagea Reported
Accurate
Inaccurate
Accurate when reported
No.b % No.b % No.b % %c
Only partial protection against HIV 186 84.9 186 84.9 0 0.0 100.0
MC is additional, not a substitute 119 54.3 118 53.9 1 0.5 99.2
Use condoms, whether circumcised or not 82 37.4 76 34.7 6 2.7 92.7
Ensure surgical safety and quality 65 29.7 62 28.3 3 1.4 95.4
All men should limit number of sexual partners 61 27.9 61 27.9 0 0.0 100.0
Lack of data on protection for women 51 23.3 45 20.5 6 2.7 88.2
Refrain from intercourse for 6 weeks after MC 39 17.8 30 13.7 9 4.1 76.9
MC has risks of complications 36 16.4 35 16.0 1 0.5 97.2
Informed consent and confidentiality 26 11.9 26 11.9 0 0.0 100.0
Not associated with risk compensation 24 11.0 10 4.6 14 6.4 41.7
Lack of data on protection for anal sex 21 9.6 19 8.7 2 0.9 90.5
Not recommended for HIV+ men 18 8.2 11 5.0 7 3.2 61.1
Medical exam to confirm healing 10 4.6 7 3.2 3 1.4 70.0
HIV testing is recommended 9 4.1 6 2.7 3 1.4 66.7
MC is very different from FGM 3 1.4 1 0.5 2 0.9 33.3

FGM, female genital mutilation; MC, male circumcision.
a The messages are listed in descending order of frequency.
b This represents the number of articles that reported the respective message, either accurately or inaccurately.
c This represents the percentage of accurate reports when the message was reported in the articles.

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