Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Rising mortality from injury in urban China: demographic burden, underlying causes and policy implications

Jiaying Zhao, Edward Jow-Ching Tu, Christine McMurray & Adrian Sleigh

Volume 90, Number 6, June 2012, 461-467

Table 1. Amenable loss of life expectancy (LE) in urban China owing to preventable injury, by sex, age and type of injury, 2004–2005

Characteristic LE if injury eliminated (years)
[A]
Loss of LE from injurya (years)
[B]
Benchmark LEb (years)
[C]
Potential increase in LEc (years)
[D]
Amenable loss of LEd (%)
[E]
Sex
Both 77.40 1.19 76.99 0.78 65.44
Males 75.32 1.44 74.80 0.91 63.57
Females 79.67 0.89 79.38 0.60 67.71
Age group
0–14 76.40 0.19 76.38 0.17 89.33
15–44 76.70 0.49 76.52 0.30 61.81
45–64 76.46 0.24 76.38 0.17 68.78
> 65 76.47 0.25 76.34 0.13 51.18
Type of injury
Road traffic 76.61 0.40 76.49 0.28 70.23
Suicide 76.41 0.19 76.33 0.12 62.59
Drowning 76.33 0.12 76.32 0.11 90.15
Falling 76.37 0.16 76.30 0.09 56.80

a Column B = column A minus actual LE in 2004–2005 (76.21 years overall, 73.88 years for males and 78.78 years for females).

b Column C shows the LE benchmarks used (drawn from Greece, the Netherlands and Sweden, countries with low mortality from injuries).

c Column D = column C minus actual LE in 2004–2005.

d Column E = (D/B) × 100. “Amenable loss of LE” refers to years of life expectancy attributable to the avoidable component of injury. In column E the amenable loss of LE is expressed as a proportion (%) of the total LE lost due to injury.

Data on life expectancy were obtained from the World Health Organization and the Third National Retrospective Survey on Causes of Death.4,12