South Sudan crisis

South Sudan declares the end of its longest cholera outbreak

Juba, South Sudan, 07 February 2018 – South Sudan declared the end of its longest and largest cholera outbreak on 7 February, with no new cases of cholera reported in over seven weeks.

WHO/South Sudan
Social mobilization and community engagement activities in Rumbek, former Lakes State

WHO promotes one-health approach to enhance response to zoonoses in South Sudan

25 January 2018 – To reduce threats posed by zoonotic diseases due to a wide range of diseases – including Rift Valley Fever, Crimean- Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Avian Influenza, Yellow Fever, as well as Lassa Fever, Ebola, and Marburg, WHO is promoting the one-health approach to ensure that the combined resources and expertise are effectively used.

WHO

Oral cholera vaccination continues in high risk locations

14 December 2017 - Cholera in South Sudan remains a public health problem which has affected 21 571 people and resulted in 462 deaths since 18 June 2016. This has been the longest and largest outbreak in magnitude and geographical extent, its impact exacerbated by the protracted crisis, insecurity, displacements and declining access to safe drinking water and sanitation. Cholera vaccinations have been deployed for a second round of cholera vaccination in high risk areas.

WHO/AFRO

WHO and partners improve maternal and child health in South Sudan

29 November 2017 - At 789 deaths per 100 000 live births, South Sudan has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. To improve the health and well-being of mothers and children, WHO with support from the Government of Canada strengthens the emergency obstetric care services through establishment of six fully equipped maternity complexes.

WHO
South Sudan implements the second round of Oral Cholera Vaccination to enhance outbreak response efforts in high risk locations

South Sudan implements the second round of Oral Cholera Vaccination to enhance outbreak response efforts in high risk locations

Juba, 14 December 2017: Cholera in South Sudan remains an important public health problem which has affected 21 571 people and resulted in 462 deaths since the onset of the outbreak on 18 June 2016. This has been the longest and largest outbreak in magnitude and geographical extent, its impact exacerbated by the protracted crisis, insecurity, displacements and declining access to safe drinking water and sanitation. Access to improved sanitation facilities across South Sudan remains at less than 10% while access to safe drinking water from improved water sources is estimated at 60%.

WHO/South Sudan

Training healthcare workers to manage priority diseases

13 November 2017 – The worsening security situation in South Sudan, along with increased population movement, and reduced health system functionality, have led to an increased risk and vulnerability to more frequent disease outbreaks. A new training for healthcare workers in South Sudan will help to detect and manage diseases at facility and community level, which is critical for containing outbreaks.




Situation and response

Woman carying her child in her arms, Northern Bahr El Ghazal State, South Sudan, 2011.

South Sudan is dealing with several complex health emergencies, including famine, conflict and disease outbreaks. Some 6 million people are at risk of starvation.

Resources

Health challenges and needs in South Sudan

Dr. Abdulmumini Usman, World Health Organization`s Country Representative in South Sudan explains key health challenges, WHO`s current activities and what specific needs could be met with further funding in the future.

Health kits


#SouthSudan

Cholera

Cholera is an acute intestinal infection caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

Malaria

Malaria is caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected female mosquitoes.

Children waiting at a hospital in Ibanda, Uganda

Measles

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease, which affects mostly children. It is transmitted via droplets from the nose, mouth or throat of infected persons.