WHO Global Coordination Mechanism on the Prevention and Control of NCDs

Photo dossier on noncommunicable disease

This series of photographs was compiled in the context of the GCM/NCD Dialogue on mobilizing international cooperation on noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), 31 November - 1 December 2015. The photos exhibit existing efforts to combat NCDs and their risk factors through the framework of North-South, South-South, and triangular cooperation.

The stories are drawn from three of WHO’s six regions and demonstrate the diversity of possible tools and resources available to tackle NCDs.


A woman holds her son in an inner city community of Belize City, 2015.
WHO/S Bones

Candy holds her son in an inner city community of Belize City. Access for women to cervical cancer screening is a challenge.


Guellemina, a cancer survivor and head of The Toledo Cancer Societz in Beliye, with her three children. Belize 2015.
WHO/S Bones

Guellemina is a cancer survivor turned community activist who is now head of the Toledo Cancer Society in Belize. Here she is pictured with her family. In Belize the Ministry of Health supports collaboration between the regional Healthy Caribbean Coalition and national Belize Cancer Society to provide education, screening and referral to treatment for women at risk of cervical cancer living in remote areas.


Steven and his grandson in Dangriga, Belize.
WHO/SAS Becker

Steven and his grandson in Dangriga, Belize. Men also have a role to play in cervical cancer prevention by supporting women in seeking cervical cancer screening services, here provided through national and regional cooperation.


Children play on the beach in Dangriga, Belize, 2015.
WHO/SAS Becker

Children play on the beach in Dangriga, Belize. Dying from cervical cancer at a reproductive age can have a devastating impact on family life. Taking into account that cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in Belize the Ministry of Health has worked closely with the civil society collaboration between the Healthy Caribbean Coalition and Belize Cancer Society to reach women in remote areas.


Melva giving her mother a kiss on the cheek, Jamaica 2015.
WHO/SAS Becker

Melva works for a church in Trench Town, Jamaica. She is pictured here with her mother, having just received a pap smear at a community outreach event organized by the Jamaica Cancer Society.


Elaine waiting for a follow-up examination organized by Jamaica Cancer Society in Steward Mountain, 2015.
WHO/S Bones

Elaine survived breast cancer but still fears a recurrence. Here she waits for a follow-up examination organized by the Jamaica Cancer Society in Stewart Mountain. The Jamaica Cancer Society works together with the Healthy Caribbean Coalition and Jamaican Government to promote cancer control and prevention in poor areas. This complements Ministry of Health services at a primary care level for cancer screening.


Nurse Donna Gordon of the Jamaica Cancer Society is conducting a pap smear in the small remote village Stewart Mountain, Jamaica 2015.
WHO/S Bones

Nurse Donna Gordon of the Jamaica Cancer Society is doing a pap smear in the small remote village Stewart Mountain. A community outreach for testing for cervical cancer is being held in a seven day Adventist church. Such events are organized in conjunction with public health campaigns through radio, television, print and other social media channels.


Marilyn, manager of the Jamaica Cancer Society branch in St Marys, gives a goodbye hug to her friend after spending the day providing cancer screening services to women in her community, Jamaica 2015.
WHO/S Bones

Marilyn, manager of the Jamaica Cancer Society branch in St Marys, says goodbye to her friend after spending the day providing cancer screening services to women in her community. The provision of these services is facilitated by the grants the Cancer Society received from the Healthy Caribbean Coalition and Australian Direct Aid Programme. These fund make pap smear screening and public health education more accessible to the at-risk women living in underserved communities.


Archive folders for Sin Tax.
WHO/B Moldenhauer

To address its obligations under the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC), and with the full engagement of both the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Health, the Philippines passed its landmark Sin Tax Reform Law in 2012.


Teenage boys smoking a cigarette, Philippines 2015.
WHO/P Goldschmid

On average, in low-and middle-income countries, an increase in tobacco prices of 10 per cent will reduce consumption by 5 per cent. Half of this reduction is attributed to people dropping the bad habit. The 341 per cent increase in excise for cigarettes in the Philippines resulting from the Sin Tax is therefore expected to generate substantial health benefits following a considerable reduction in consumption.


A patient receives a free flu vaccination at the Rosario Reyes Health Centre in Manila, the Philippines, 2015.
WHO/P Goldschmid

The Sin Tax facilitates the realisation of universal health care coverage. Here, a patient receives a free flu vaccination at the Rosario Reyes Health Centre in Manila, the Philippines. The incremental revenue generated from the Sin Tax are earmarked for services such as these.


A boy at the Rosario Reyes Day Care Center, run by the local government of Manila. The Philippines 2015.
WHO/P Goldschmid

The Rosario Reyes Day Care Center is run by the local government of Manila under the Department of Social Welfare and Development, in conjunction with the adjoining health centre of the same name. The revenues generated from the Sin Tax ensure a source of sustainable financing for public health services, especially primary healthcare and community services.


Mike of the Uganda NCD Alliance leads a parade around the community in Kampala to raise awareness of NCDs, Uganda 2015.
WHO/A Wang

Mike of the Uganda NCD Alliance leads a parade around the community in Kampala to raise awareness of NCDs. The NCD Alliance in Uganda is funded by the Danish NCD Alliance through a Danish Government (DANIDA) civil society fund and operates through a well-established collaboration with Uganda's Ministry of Health.


A young man working in the market receives advocacy information on the danger of tobacco during a NCD awareness campaign in Kampala, Uganda, 2015.
WHO/A Wang

A young man working in the market receives advocacy information on the danger of tobacco during a NCD awareness campaign in Kampala, Uganda. Community outreach to educate people about NCDs is a core part of the work of the Uganda NCD Alliance.


Molly from the Uganda NCD Alliance engaging with spectators during a parade organized in Kampala to raise awareness of NCDs, Uganda 2015.
WHO/P Goldschmid

Molly from the Uganda NCD Alliance engaging with spectators during a parade organized in Kampala to raise awareness of NCDs. Through their work the Alliance provides members of the community and patients with representation for better access to care.


A man leads a group aerobics session to kick-start a NCD awareness and screening campaign in Kampala, Uganda 2015.
WHO/A Wang

A group aerobics session kick-start a NCD awareness and screening campaign in Kampala, Uganda. This all-day event is organised by the Uganda NCD Alliance in order to tackle the lack of awareness about NCDs, their prevention, symptoms and control.


A woman gets screened for diabetes during a campaign organised by the Uganda Diabetes Association for Kampala residents, Uganda 2015.
WHO/A Wang

The Uganda Diabetes Association provides screening for diabetes for Kampala residents. In 2010 diabetes was the only NCD that had a dedicated association in Uganda. Through its collaboration with the Danish NCD Alliance, the Uganda NCD Alliance now has 10 branches, 9000 members, and approximately 150 voluntary workers tackling diabetes, cancers, and cardiovascular diseases.


Mbambu Alphosina, a young Kampala resident, completes a free cancer screening at an event organised by the Uganda NCD Alliance. Uganda 2015.
WHO/P Goldschmid

Mbambu Alphosina, a young Kampala resident, completes a free cancer screening at an event organised by the Uganda NCD Alliance. Government support for strengthening international cooperation on NCDs has been vital in Uganda in order to provide such access to both detection and treatment.