Global Observatory for eHealth

2013 Survey

eHealth and innovation in women's and children's health: A baseline review

Women’s and children’s health are a global concern, demonstrated recently by the publication of the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health and the creation of the United Nations Commission on Information and Accountability for Women’s and Children’s Health (CoIA). The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) also pay special attention to women’s and children’s mortality by setting targets to reduce (by two-thirds by 2015) the under-five mortality rate (Goal 4), and to reduce (by three-quarters, by 2015) the maternal mortality ratio (Goal 5). Further, MDG 8 target 18 states that the public sector needs to cooperate with the private sector to make available the benefits of new technologies - especially information and communication technologies (ICT).

It is increasingly recognized that eHealth, the use of ICT to enhance health systems and services, is one of the most rapidly growing fields in health today. It offers innovative and cost-effective opportunities to improve the health of women and children. This survey collected and analysed data on progress being made in the uptake of eHealth in countries - particularly in the use of eHealth for the benefit of women’s and children’s health. It was conducted in the 75 CoIA priority countries and 64 countries responded. A survey report and atlas were produced in collaboration with our partner the International Telecommunication Union.

Survey topics covered include:

  • Health monitoring and surveillance
  • Systems for the registration of vital events
  • Systems for monitoring RMNCH indicators
  • National electronic health information systems
  • Resource tracking systems
  • National eHealth strategies
  • eHealth for women and children
  • Types of eHealth initiatives supporting women's and children's health
  • Providing access to information for citizens and health-care professionals
  • Enabling eHealth programmes
  • Online safety for children
  • Privacy

Global survey questionnaire

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