Hepatitis

Types of hepatitis

This section contains comprehensive information on key topics related to the work of the WHO Global Hepatitis Programme.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus. The virus is primarily spread when an uninfected (and unvaccinated) person ingests food or water that is contaminated with the faeces of an infected person. The disease is closely associated with unsafe water, inadequate sanitation and poor personal hygiene.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a potentially life-threatening liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus. It is a major global health problem. It can cause chronic infection and puts people at high risk of death from cirrhosis and liver cancer. The virus is transmitted through contact with the blood or other body fluids of an infected person.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus: the virus can cause both acute and chronic hepatitis infection, ranging in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness. The hepatitis C virus is a bloodborne virus and the most common modes of infection are through unsafe injection practices; inadequate sterilization of medical equipment in some health-care settings; and unscreened blood and blood products.

Hepatitis D

Hepatitis D is passed on through contact with infected blood. It only occurs in people who are already infected with the hepatitis B virus. People who are not already infected with hepatitis B can therefore prevent hepatitis D infection by getting vaccinated against hepatitis B.

Hepatitis E

Hepatitis E is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis E virus: a non-enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus. The hepatitis E virus is transmitted mainly through contaminated drinking water. It is usually a self-limiting infection and resolves within 4–6 weeks. Occasionally, a fulminant form of hepatitis develops (acute liver failure), which can lead to death.

World Hepatitis Summit 2017

Date: 1-3 November 2017 Place: São Paulo, Brazil

World Hepatitis Day - 28 July

Contact us

World Health Organization
Global Hepatitis Programme
20, Avenue Appia
CH-1211 Geneva 27
Switzerland
Email: hepatitis@who.int