HIV/AIDS

Global Health Sector Strategies for HIV, viral hepatitis, STIs, 2016-2021

Collage of meeting participants
Photo collage from GHSS consultation meetings

As the world looks to 2030, and prepares to meet the challenges of an ambitious set of Sustainable Development Goals, the World Health Organization developed three global health sector strategies to cover HIV, viral hepatitis, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The strategies cover the period 2016-2021 and were endorsed by the Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly on 28 May 2016.

The Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly endorsed the draft strategies on 28 May 2016

Group of girls with smiling faces

HIV

The WHO Executive Board at its 138th session in January 2016 recommended that the Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly consider the draft strategy and that the Secretariat draft a resolution for its possible adoption.

Draft global health sector strategy on HIV, 2016-2021

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly provisional agenda item 15.1. Document A69/31.

A child from Haiti.

Viral hepatitis

The WHO Executive Board at its 138th session in January 2016 recommended that the Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly consider the draft strategy and that the Secretariat draft a resolution for its possible adoption.

Draft global health sector strategy on viral hepatitis, 2016-2021

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly provisional agenda item 15.1. Document A69/32.

Condoms of different colours

Sexually Transmitted Infections

The proposed strategy provides a framework for joint WHO and Member State action at the global, regional and country levels. It is based on achievements and lessons learnt from the former global strategy, which covered the period 2006–2015.

Draft global health sector strategy on sexually transmitted infections, 2016– 2021

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly provisional agenda item 15.1. Document A69/33.

Background

The Global health sector strategy on HIV/AIDS, 2011-2015, endorsed by the World Health Assembly in 2011 (resolution WHA64.14), is ending. Strategy progress was discussed at WHA67 in May 2014. During these discussions several Member States requested the WHO Secretariat start a process to develop a post-2015 HIV strategy.

In 2006, the WHA approved the Global strategy for the prevention and control of sexually transmitted infections: 2006-2015 (resolution WHA59.19). The final progress report on of strategy implementation was presented to the WHA (WHA68.36) and highlighted the need for a successor strategy for the post-2015 period.

Since 2012 WHO's Global Hepatitis Programme has been guided by the Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis Infection: Framework for Global Action. A resolution on hepatitis (WHA67.6) was adopted by the WHA in May 2014, calling for an intensified and expanded global hepatitis response and for the WHO Secretariat to examine the feasibility of elimination of hepatitis B and C.

Structure and approach

The three draft strategies are organized around a similar structure to include the following:

  • Context and rationale: making the case for action
  • Vision, goals and targets in conjunction with the United Nations sustainable development goals and disease-specific targets
  • Three organizing frameworks: universal health coverage (UHC); the continuum of health services; and the public health approach.
  • Five strategic directions:
    • Strategic direction 1 – Strategic information for focus and accountability - Focuses on the need to understand the epidemic and response as a basis for advocacy, political commitment, national planning, resource mobilization and allocation, implementation, and programme improvement.
    • Strategic direction 2 – Essential interventions for impact – Addresses the first dimension of universal health coverage by describing the essential package of high-impact interventions that need to be delivered along the continuum of health services to reach country and global targets, and that should be considered for inclusion in national health benefit packages.
    • Strategic direction 3 – Delivering for quality and equity – Addresses the second dimension of universal health coverage by identifying the best methods and approaches for delivering the continuum of high-impact health interventions and services to different populations and in different locations, so as to achieve equity and ensure quality.
    • Strategic direction 4 – Financing for sustainability – Addresses the third dimension of universal health coverage by identifying sustainable and innovative models for financing of the response and approaches for reducing costs so that so that people can access the necessary services without incurring financial hardship.
    • Strategic direction 5 – Innovation for acceleration – Identifies those areas where there are major gaps in knowledge and technologies where innovation is required to shift the trajectory of the response so that the 2020 and 2030 targets can be achieved.
  • Strategy implementation

Consultation

A broad consultative process to inform the content of the strategies was held in 2015 and involved all key partners, including Member States, organizations in the United Nations system and other multilateral agencies, donor and development agencies, civil society, nongovernmental organizations, scientific and technical institutions and networks, and the private sector.

Numerous stakeholder consultations were held, and more than 90 Member States participated in consultations held in all WHO regions from April–July 2015. To supplement these consultations and ensure the broadest participation, the Secretariat hosted a widely-promoted public on-line consultation for six weeks in the period April through June 2015. WHO departments and regional offices also fed into the strategies. Reports from the consultations are available on the right.

Consultations

European Regional Consultation | Copenhagen, Denmark, 23-26 June 2015

Online consultation

Regional workshop | New Delhi, India, 1-3 June 2015

Regional workshop | Beirut, 5-6 May 2015

Regional consultation | Johannesburg, South Africa, 28-30 April 2015

Regional consultation | Sao Paulo, Brazil, 14-16 April 2015