Infection prevention and control

Focus on AMR - evidence, guidelines and publications

Guidelines for the prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in health care facilities

Carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, namely, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPsA), are an emerging cause of health-care acquired infection that pose a significant threat to public health. The first ever global guidelines for the prevention and control of CRE-CRAB-CRPsA in health care facilities were published on 14 November 2017. They include 8 recommendations distilled by the world’s leading experts from a review of the latest evidence. They are designed to provide evidence-based recommendations on the early recognition and specific required infection prevention and control practices (IPC) and procedures to effectively prevent the occurrence and control the spread of CRE-CRAB-CRPsA colonization and/or infection in acute health care facilities. They provide an evidence-based framework to help inform the development and/or strengthening of national and facility IPC policies and programmes to control the transmission of CRE-CRAB-CRPsA in a variety of health care settings. The recommendations included in these guidelines build upon the overarching standards set by the WHO publication Guidelines on core components of infection prevention and control programmes at the national and acute health care facility level.



These guidelines are intended to support IPC improvement at the facility level, targeting infection prevention leads, senior managers, other health care professionals and patients alike. They are also relevant to policy makers, regulatory and professional bodies at the national level, among others. We encourage you all to use and promote these guidelines.


Teleclass: Guidelines for the prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in health care facilities