Mental health

mhGAP Evidence Resource Centre

The mhGAP Evidence Resource Centre contains the background material, process documents, and the evidence profiles and recommendations in electronic format for mhGAP guidelines for mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders. The evidence resource centre is organized around the mhGAP priority conditions.

The evidence-based mhGAP guidelines are the basis of the mhGAP Intervention Guide for Mental, Neurological and Substance use disorders in Non-Specialized Settings.

The mhGAP guidelines were initially developed in 2009 with regular updates. The mhGAP guidelines have been further revised, updated, and expanded in 2015. All the recommendations for MNS disorders are identified according to the following categories:

[New 2015]: Indicates that the evidence has been reviewed and the recommendation added in 2015.
[Updated 2015]: Indicates that the evidence has been reviewed and the recommendation has been updated in 2015.
[2015]: Indicates that the evidence has been reviewed but no change has been made to the recommended action in 2015.
[2012]: Indicates that the evidence has been reviewed but no change has been made to the recommended action in 2012.

mhGAP GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

The mental health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) guidelines on interventions for mental, neurological and substance use disorders have been developed following the WHO process for development of guidelines.

Explanation of strength of recommendations

The Guideline Development Group provided a judgment on the strength of each recommendation to be categorized as "STRONG" or “CONDITIONAL". Determinants of the strength of recommendation included the quality of the evidence, the balance between desirable and undesirable effects, values, preferences and feasibility issues.

  • A “STRONG” recommendation is one for which the guideline development group is confident that most patients should receive the recommended course of action, and policy makers can easily adapt the recommendation as policy in most situations.
  • A “CONDITIONAL” recommendation is one for which the guideline development group is confident that the recommended course of action may be offered for the majority of patients, but this may not be applicable for many patients. Policy makers can use standard recommendations as a starting point for further discussions with the stakeholders before deciding to include them in the adapted versions.