Meeting of Interested Parties (MIP)

Evidence for Health Policy

EIP Responsiveness

Why is responsiveness important? The WHO's work on health system responsiveness has built on established research in the fields of patient satisfaction and patient reports of their experiences with health systems.

Millennium Development Goals

At the Millennium Summit in 2000, representatives from 189 countries committed themselves toward a world in which sustaining development and eliminating poverty would have the highest priority. The Millennium development goals (MDGs) summarize these commitments and have been commonly accepted as a framework for measuring development progress. They are an integral part of the “Road map towards the implementation of the United Nations Millennium Declaration”.

Millennium Development Goals Indicators

At the Millennium Summit in 2000, representatives from 189 countries committed themselves toward a world in which sustaining development and eliminating poverty would have the highest priority. The millennium development goals (MDGs), with their targets and indicators, summarize these commitments and have been commonly accepted as a framework for measuring development progress. Of the total of 48 indicators, 18 are directly related to health.

World Health Report 2003 Summary

The World Health Report 2003: Shaping the Future will be published on December 18, 2003. The report spans a wide range of issues. Its main theme is the urgent need to strengthen health systems, particularly in the poorest countries, in order to make significant gains in health.

The Global Burden of Disease

The WHO Global Burden of Disease 2000 study (GBD 2000) draws on a wide range of data sources to develop internally consistent estimates of incidence, health state prevalence, severity and duration, and mortality for over 130 major causes, for 17 sub-regions of the world. WHO program participation in the development and finalisation of these estimates ensures that estimates reflect all information and knowledge available to WHO. Version 2 estimates of incidence and point prevalence for selected major causes by sub-region were made available on the WHO website at www.who.int/evidence/bod at the time of the release of the World Health Report 2002.

Global Mortality Data

To assess overall levels of health achievement, it is crucial to develop the best possible assessment of the life table for each country. Each year, new life tables are developed for all 192 Member States starting with a systematic review of all available evidence from surveys, censuses, sample registration systems, population laboratories and vital registration on levels and trends in child mortality and adult mortality. Following country consultations, best estimates of child and adult mortality rates and life expectancies are published in the World Health Report for all Member States.

National Burden of Disease: WHO Prior Estimates

WHO has developed a National Burden of Disease (NBD) Toolkit, the key components of which are WHO 'prior' estimates of mortality and burden of disease for UN Member States for the year 2000. These estimates are based on Version 2 results for the Global Burden of Disease 2000 study as published in the World Health Report 2002. Mortality estimates are based on analysis of latest available national information on levels of mortality and cause distributions. YLD estimates are based on the GBD 2000 analyses of incidence, prevalence, duration and severity of conditions for the relevant epidemiological subregion, together with national and subnational level information available to WHO. The GBD 2000 uses the latest population estimates for WHO Member States prepared by the UN Population Division.

WHO has developed a National Burden of Disease (NBD) Toolkit, the key components of which are WHO 'prior' estimates of mortality and burden of disease for UN Member States for the year 2000. These estimates are based on Version 2 results for the Global Burden of Disease 2000 study as published in the World Health Report 2002. Mortality estimates are based on analysis of latest available national information on levels of mortality and cause distributions. YLD estimates are based on the GBD 2000 analyses of incidence, prevalence, duration and severity of conditions for the relevant epidemiological subregion, together with national and subnational level information available to WHO. The GBD 2000 uses the latest population estimates for WHO Member States prepared by the UN Population Division.

Valid, comprehensive and comparable information about diseases and injuries, their incidences, their consequence, their causation and their trend is more than ever necessary to inform policy-making. In a context where increasingly vocal and well informed people demand more health services and interventions than available resources can finance, decision-makers at all levels are increasingly required to evaluate the impact of health policies, to justify the adoption of new ones and to ensure that information is available for inter-programme comparisons.

Causes of Death

Causes of death for 14 subregions of the WHO regions and the world are reported annually in the World Health Report. WHO uses data provided by Member States, together with all available other sources of information on causes of death, to estimate death rates by age, sex for underlying causes of death as defined by the ICD classification rules. In 2001, there were a total of 56.5 million deaths globally.

HALE: Healthy Life Expectancy

Healthy life expectancy summarizes total life expectancy into equivalent years of "full health" by taking into account years lived in less than full health due to diseases and injuries. The World Health Organization (WHO) has for the last three years published estimates of healthy life expectancy as well as total life expectancy for its Member States in its annual World Health Report.

WHO-CHOICE: CHoosing Interventions that are Cost Effective

Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is one tool decision-makers can use to assess and potentially improve the performance of their health systems. It indicates which interventions provide the highest "value for money" and helps them choose the interventions and programmes which maximize health for the available resources.

Summary Measures of Population Health

Summary measures of population health are used by the World Health Organization to report on levels of health and inequalities in health for its Member States, to report on the causes of loss of health in terms of diseases, injuries and risk factors, to advise on potential gains in health through cost-effective interventions, and in the analysis of the efficiency of health systems around the globe.

Health Systems Performance Assessment

This volume reports on a large body of work led by the World Health Organization that is intended to strengthen the foundations for evidence-based policies aimed at health systems development.

Guide to producing national health accounts with special applications for low-income and middle-income countries

National health accounts are a powerful and practical tool for policy-makers interested in evaluating and restructuring their nation's health care financing and in developing and assessing financial interventions to improve people's health.

This Guide to producing national health accounts, with special applications for low-income and middle- income countries provides practical help in developing this socioeconomic information.

Health Metrics Network

Health Metrics Network: An update after 50 days
Current practices in health information
Opportunities for improvement
Added value of HMN
Process of development

Knowledge Management

Knowledge Management in Public Health