Family Planning Summit

11 JULY | LONDON


Parallel Session on the Role of the Private Sector

“Private Enterprise for Public Health – Creating Shared Value and Collective Impact”

Marc Pfitzer, Managing Director FSG; Awa Coll-Seck, Min. of Health Senegal; Chris Locke,  Managing Director, GSMA; Naveen Rao, Lead on Merck for Mothers, Merck, Flavia Bustreo, Assistant Director General, WHO
From left to right: Marc Pfitzer, Managing Director FSG; Awa Coll-Seck, Min. of Health Senegal; Chris Locke, Managing Director, GSMA; Naveen Rao, Lead on Merck for Mothers, Merck, Flavia Bustreo, Assistant Director General, WHO

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 4:00-5:15 P.M.
Hosts: The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH); Innovation Working Group (IWG) in support of UN Every Woman Every Child; and the United Nations Foundation (UNF), in collaboration with the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF)

This interactive and forward looking session highlighted the critical role of the private sector and its still largely untapped potential , and launched the private sector engagement guide Private Enterprise for Public Health to trigger further business engagement. The session discussed an important paradigm shift in partnerships between the private and public sector to achieve health Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and economic development, and how this can improve family planning and reproductive health. Organized by PMNCH and the UN Foundation in collaboration with the UN Innovation Working Group (IWG), and moderated by Caroline Hyde from Bloomberg TV, this session was attended by leaders from government, business, NGOs and academia.

Introduced by the Summit organizers, represented by the UK Minister for International Development Alan Duncan and Chris Elias, President of the Global Development Program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the session demonstrated how leading businesses from different industries contribute to the creation of shared value and a collective impact to improve women's and children's health including family planning. "We need to inject the private sector into the DNA of international development", said Minister Alan Duncan in his welcoming remarks. And, as remarked by the co-chair of IWG, Tore Godal, Special Adviser to Prime Minister of Norway on shared value, "Doing good is also good business; the growth of mobile technology industry is an example of how everyone in the world is becoming part of the market". Through innovation, focused investments and transformational business models companies can open new avenues for sustainable healthcare provision and improve the way health care and family planning services are delivered in some of the poorest countries.

Private Sector Guide launched

This session launched a new private sector engagement guide to further catalyze action by companies, entitled Private Enterprise for Public Health: Opportunities for Business to Improve Women's and Children's Health. The guide explores how businesses can help save the lives of 16 million women and children by 2015. By using the principles of shared value and collective impact, the guide presents opportunities for different industries to improve women's and children's health through the development of new products or services, improved delivery and health systems. Moving beyond the concepts of philanthropy and corporate social responsibility, the guide identifies areas of engagement for companies through their core business skills for the development of sustainable solutions. These solutions can be brought to scale via transformative partnerships with multiple stakeholders including governments, the United Nations, civil society and others to accelerate the achievement of the health related Millennium Development Goals and as such improve access to family planning and reproductive health. At the launch, business leaders from Johnson&Johnson, Merck and GSMA, the leading mobile industry association representing over 800 mobile phone companies, spoke to the importance of partnerships for delivering sustainable solutions. As Naveen Rao from Merck said, "Sustainability and partnerships are the key for long-term success." The guide offers several concrete examples of innovative, sustainable and scalable partnerships with companies, including Intel, Globo TV, Safaricom, Bharti Airtel, Novartis, Merck, J&J and Becton Dickinson among others.

Private Enterprise for Public Health was developed under the auspices of the Innovation Working Group (IWG) in support of Every Woman Every Child, co-chaired by the Government of Norway and Johnson & Johnson, and the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH) in collaboration with FSG consultancy, Global Development and other partners. An extensive consultation process with businesses and other stakeholders, through interviews and key events, including the World Economic Forum in Davos (2012), took place over the course of one year. Over 70 private sector initiatives were reviewed from five key industries including pharmaceuticals, medical devices, digital technologies, financial services and media & communication.

With the 2015 deadline to achieve the Millennium Development Goals fast approaching, the time to act is now. The session and the guide laid the foundation for continuous family planning success, in support of the Every Women Every Child global effort, to build on the momentum of the London Summit on Family Planning goals to reach 120 million additional women in the world's poorest countries , through shared value and collective impact with businesses from various industries to access and use voluntary family planning information, services and supplies by 2020. As Chris Elias, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation affirmed: "Our success depends on forging innovations and new partnerships with the private sector. To positively affect 120 million women we have to take a broader perspective - not just working through vertical silos in family planning, but integrated efforts addressing a spectrum of interrelated issues in reproductive, maternal, and newborn health".

If you are interested to collaborate on next steps of implementing practical solutions through shared value and collective impact in support of family planning and Every Woman Every Child effort in select countries, please contact the Innovation Working Group at iwg-pmnch@who.int.

Info and contact

On your right, find a link to read the guide in full and learn about the innovative ways that companies and governments are working together to improve women and children's health and find links to the IWG - the Innovation Working Group.
For further information on the event:
Barbara Bulc, Global Development, Advisor to PMNCH, bbulc@gd-impact.org

Speakers and quotes

Minister Alan Duncan MP, Minister of State for International Development, DFID

• We need to inject the private sector into the DNA of international development.

Chris Elias, President of Global Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

• To reach 120 million, we have to take a broader perspective -- not just work through vertical silos in family planning, but integrate with RMNCH efforts

Tore Godal, Special Adviser to Prime Minister of Norway and Co-Chair, UN Secretary General's Innovation Working Group

• Doing good is also good business... Mobile technology means everybody in the world is becoming part of the market.

Scott Ratzan, M.D. Vice President, Global Health, Johnson & Johnson and Co-Chair, UN Secretary General’s Innovation Working Group

• We want to move to shared values – business values and where they overlap with social values.

Purnima Mane, CEO, Pathfinder

• The days of misunderstanding between stakeholders – private sector, NGOs, governments etc., are over, we now listen to each other, we learn from each other. We need to find every partner that is able to bring the best skills and knowledge to the debate.

Marc Pfitzer, Managing Director, FSG Europe

• Not about one product donation or quick injection of funds. It is about a deep engagement with partners, shared understanding and measurement of progress. This is going for the long haul.

Awa Marie Coll-Seck, Senegal, Minister of Health, Senegal

• In Senegal we have lots of experience in partnering with the private sector in fighting HIV, Malaria etc.,

• Nobody alone can deliver results - we need to work together, governments, business, NGO and other partners for success

• I would like to use this guide to get the private sector partnership going in Senegal. But we all need guides. Disseminate it and we can use it as examples of what to use.

• Whenever in the past private sector wanted to get engaged, there was little trust

Naveen Rao, Lead at Merck for Mothers, Merck

• The word Partnership is important; at Merck we have learned so much from this experience.

• Sustainability. The ability to work with local business that have the infrastructure should not be overlooked, we need to support them to provide the family planning services once the programmes stop.

Chris Locke, Managing Director, GSMA Development Fund

• Once the infrastructure is there, even in the mobile industry, it can be used for health.

Flavia Bustreo, Assistant Director-General, Family, Women’s and Children’s Health, WHO

• This is not about donations, not about some surplus in profit to make us look good – this is a search to that sustainable and long term partnership. The guide attempts to stimulate that relationship. It identifies that trust is important.

• We have to have accountability. We need to check that promises are delivered. The accountability commission plays an important role.

Carole Presern, Director, PMNCH

• Now is time for action and next steps with focus on countries, PMNCH is committed to work with all partners and members in this joint effort.

Kathy Calvin, CEO, UN Foundation

• This is all about collaboration and partnerships.

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