Florence Fouque appointed to lead vectors, environment and society

TDR news item
27 June 2014

Dr Florence Fouque has been appointed as the new leader of TDR’s unit on vectors, environment and society, to start in mid-September. Dr Fouque is a French national with a broad range of management, research and teaching experience in vector-borne diseases. She most recently was the head of the Laboratory of Medical Entomology at the Pasteur Institute in Les Abymes, Guadeloupe.

TDR Director John Reeder says, “Dr Fouque is an excellent fit for TDR, where we work on a number of vector-borne diseases and approaches. Her broad experience in remote settings and excellent research credentials are ideal for continuing the TDR tradition of increasing research capacity in low- and middle-income countries.”

“Dr Fouque’s broad experience in remote settings and excellent research credentials are ideal for continuing the TDR tradition of increasing research capacity in low- and middle-income countries.”

John Reeder, TDR Director

For the last 20 years, Dr Fouque has worked as an entomologist in the International Network of the Pasteur Institutes in several countries, managing vector biology projects in different ecological, socio-economic and political environments. Her first overseas position in French Guiana, in the Amazonian forest and ecosystem, helped shape her approach that reinforces community involvement and communication. She worked through two dengue epidemics where there were different needs for the rural and urban creole communities. And she experienced firsthand the rigors of these rural sites. She says, “I remember the long days of field trips along the rivers to reach remote villages where malaria was common and the houses had just one or two wooden walls.”

Dr Fouque also worked in France on other arboviruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as the West Nile virus (WNV) and the Toscana virus carried by sandflies, and collaborated on the response plan after the 2004 tsunami in South-East Asia. Working in the Caribbean for the last three years, she has dealt with the emergence of the first American Chikungunya epidemic, a disease that is transmitted by the same mosquito that carries dengue ― Aedes aegypti.

“We still have a long way to go to control these vector-borne disease epidemics,” she says, “so I am very happy to come to TDR to lead studies on the connections between the environment, society and vectors, where we will continue to develop strong, community-based solutions.”

For more information, contact:

Jamie Guth
TDR Communications Manager
Telephone: +41 79 441 2289
E-mail:guthj@who.int

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