New open access policy for publication of TDR-supported research

TDR news item
27 June 2014

Starting 1 July, all TDR funded researchers will be supported to publish findings in open access journals. This is part of TDR’s commitment to ensuring that research results are available to all scientists, no matter what country they live in, and is being implemented under the World Health Organization’s open access policy.

Open access is a policy that ensures research published in external journals is available to the public and is not associated with related costs, such as subscription fees. This practice is important as it enhances transparency, improves study accountability, and allows for the more widespread and equitable dissemination of health research. “Open access allows any reader with access to the internet to find and read entire articles,” TDR’s Robert Terry explained. “Researchers and policy-makers can find and combine information without having to seek permission or pay any costs.”

“Open access allows any reader with access to the internet to find and read entire articles. Researchers and policy-makers can find and combine information without having to seek permission or pay any costs.”

Robert Terry, Manager of TDR Knowledge Management

WHO is launching this policy 1 July and will publish all of its authored and funded research projects in open access platforms. Although the reports and guidelines that WHO publishes itself are freely available through its website, WHO-authored or financed work in external journals is often only permitted for viewing after paying either subscription or user fees.

TDR is advocating WHO’s open access initiative in its own publication protocols. Starting next month, all recipients of TDR funding who wish to publish results of their work externally will have to take publication fees into account in their budgets or requests for funding.

A cornerstone of this policy’s success, Terry continued, is the deposition of digital articles in a public repository to ensure that the material is preserved and to facilitate future access. WHO’s partnership with Europe PubMed Central in May provides a channel for open access, identification, and tracking of articles within the online platform. TDR will similarly work toward archiving TDR funded research publications in public spaces. “Management of information will become more efficient, and as the subscription barrier to access is removed, our work will benefit from much greater visibility, thereby enhancing its impact.”

For more information, contact:

Robert Terry (terryr@who.int)

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