Latest homepage stories

Below are the most recent top stories from the WHO homepage.


Dr Tedros to lead WHO delegation at the G20 Summit

4 July 2017 – WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus will lead the WHO delegation at the G20 Summit on 7–8 July 2017, in Hamburg, Germany. Dr Tedros will participate in all G20 sessions during the Summit, including deliberations on priorities for health, global growth, trade, sustainable development, climate, energy, partnership with Africa, migration, digitalization, women’s empowerment, and employment.

Dr Tedros to lead WHO delegation at the G20 Summit

WHO Director-General Dr Tedros addresses staff at WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland.
WHO/C.Black

4 July 2017 – WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus will lead the WHO delegation at the G20 Summit on 7–8 July 2017, in Hamburg, Germany. Dr Tedros will participate in all G20 sessions during the Summit, including deliberations on priorities for health, global growth, trade, sustainable development, climate, energy, partnership with Africa, migration, digitalization, women’s empowerment, and employment.

End of the most recent Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo

2 July 2017 – Today, WHO declared the end of the most recent outbreak of Ebola virus disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). "With the end of this epidemic, DRC has once again proved to the world that we can control the very deadly Ebola virus if we respond early in a coordinated and efficient way,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General.

End of the most recent Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo

2 July 2017 – Today, WHO declared the end of the most recent outbreak of Ebola virus disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The announcement comes 42 days (two 21-day incubation cycles of the virus) after the last confirmed Ebola patient in the affected Bas-Uélé province tested negative for the disease for the second time. Enhanced surveillance in the country will continue, as well as strengthening of preparedness and readiness for Ebola outbreaks. "With the end of this epidemic, DRC has once again proved to the world that we can control the very deadly Ebola virus if we respond early in a coordinated and efficient way,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General.

Beating noncommunicable diseases in the Islamic Republic of Iran

30 June 2017 - Since the 1960s, the Islamic Republic of Iran’s urban population has tripled and life expectancies have risen. This, however, has increased people’s exposure to tobacco, unhealthy diets, and physical inactivity – among the main risk factors for cardiovascular and lung diseases, cancer, and diabetes. Thankfully, advances to reduce the devastating impacts of NCDs are progressing rapidly, supported by strong governance and collaboration across all sectors of society.

Ending discrimination in health care settings

27 June 2017 - Discrimination in health care is widespread across the world and takes many forms. It violates the most fundamental human rights and affects both users of health care services and health care workers. The new joint United Nations statement on ending discrimination in health care settings calls for health workers to fulfil their responsibilities, but also to have their rights protected. Many health workers, especially women, are themselves vulnerable and victims of discrimination, abuse, and violence.

Cholera outbreak in Yemen

24 June 2017 – The rapidly spreading cholera outbreak in Yemen has exceeded 200,000 suspected cases, increasing at an average of 5,000 a day. We are now facing the worst cholera outbreak in the world. UNICEF, WHO and our partners are racing to stop the acceleration of this deadly outbreak.

Public health surveillance ethics

26 June 2017 -- Public health officials regularly collect and analyse data to map disease, spot patterns, identify causes and respond to outbreaks. But surveillance can lead to harm if people’s privacy is violated, or they are stigmatized on the basis of the information they provide about themselves. WHO’s new Guidelines on ethical issues in public health surveillance offer 17 guidelines that can assist everyone involved in surveillance to make the right decisions.

What is people-centred care?

22 June 2017 – Globally, 1 in 20 people still lacks access to essential health services that could be delivered at a primary care clinic instead of a hospital. Where services are accessible, they can be fragmented and of poor quality. WHO is supporting countries to progress towards universal health coverage by designing health services for people instead of diseases and health institutions, so that everyone gets the right care, at the right time, in the right place.

What is people-centred care?

22 June 2017 – Globally, 1 in 20 people still lacks access to essential health services that could be delivered at a primary care clinic instead of a hospital. Where services are accessible, they can be fragmented and of poor quality. WHO is supporting countries to progress towards universal health coverage by designing health services for people instead of diseases and health institutions, so that everyone gets the right care, at the right time, in the right place.

#WithRefugees: WHO-trained Syrian health workers provide services in Turkey

19 June 2017 – More than 3 million Syrian refugees are now living in Turkey. In 2016, the Turkish government enacted a law that allows Syrian health professionals to enter the workforce in the Turkish health system, with the aim of both integrating Syrian professionals into the health system and also ensuring that Syrian refugees can receive health care without encountering language or cultural barriers. WHO and the Public Health Institution of Turkey created an adaptation training for Syrian health workers.

#WithRefugees: WHO-trained Syrian health workers provide services in Turkey

19 June 2017 – More than 3 million Syrian refugees are now living in Turkey. In 2016, the Turkish government enacted a law that allows Syrian health professionals to enter the workforce in the Turkish health system, with the aim of both integrating Syrian professionals into the health system and also ensuring that Syrian refugees can receive health care without encountering language or cultural barriers. WHO and the Public Health Institution of Turkey created an adaptation training for Syrian health workers living Turkey – including doctors, nurses and midwives.

#WithRefugees: WHO-trained Syrian health workers provide services in Turkey

19 June 2017 – More than 3 million Syrian refugees are now living in Turkey – the country with the highest number of refugees in the world. In 2016, the Turkish government enacted a law that allows Syrian health professionals to enter the workforce in the Turkish health system, with the aim of both integrating Syrian professionals into the health system and also ensuring that Syrian refugees can receive health care without encountering language or cultural barriers. WHO and the Public Health Institution of Turkey created an adaptation training for Syrian health workers living Turkey – including doctors, nurses and midwives.

Abuse of older people on the rise – 1 in 6 affected

14 June 2017 – Around 1 in 6 older people experience some form of abuse, a figure higher than previously estimated and predicted to rise as populations age worldwide. Awareness about elder abuse, still largely a taboo topic, has started to increase across the world. It is defined as actions or lack of appropriate action which can cause harm or distress to an older person, occurring within any relationship where there is an expectation of trust.

Giving blood in a time of crisis

13 June 2017 – In the days following Nepal’s devastating earthquake in 2015, hundreds of volunteers came forward to donate blood. But crucially, Nepal already had a substantial supply of blood, thanks to years of work to build a culture of voluntary blood donation. On World Blood Donor Day, WHO is emphasizing the role that every individual can play in preparing for the next unforeseen emergency by giving blood now.

Bhutan, Maldives eliminate measles

13 June 2017 – Bhutan and Maldives have eliminated measles, a highly infectious disease that is a major childhood killer globally. The 2 countries are the first in the
WHO South-East Asia Region to be verified for having interrupted endemic measles virus transmission, ahead of the 2020 regional target.

Treating trauma and the wounds of war in Helmand

8 June 2017 – Intensifying conflict in Helmand and other provinces in Afghanistan has increased the need for specialized trauma care. Currently around 4.5 million Afghans live in conflict-affected districts with extremely limited access to health services. For the past 3 years, WHO has supported the providing of trauma care services in Helmand through the 90-bed Surgical Centre for War Victims.

WHO responds to Ebola in Democratic Republic of the Congo

6 June 2017 – Multidisciplinary teams face numerous challenges as they respond to an outbreak of Ebola virus disease in the remote, forested regions of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. WHO and partners are supporting the country’s Ministry of Health in all aspects of the response, including epidemiological investigation, surveillance, logistics and supplies, communications, and community engagement.

Essential Medicines List updated with new advice on antibiotics

6 June 2017 – New advice on which antibiotics to use for common infections and which to preserve for serious circumstances is among additions to the WHO Model list of essential medicines for 2017. Other additions include medicines for HIV, hepatitis C, tuberculosis, and leukaemia. The model list is used by many countries to increase access to medicines and guide decisions about which products they ensure are available for their populations.

New vector control response a game-changer

1 June 2017 – Today more than 80% of the world’s population is at risk of vector-borne disease, with half at risk of two or more diseases. Mosquitoes, flies and bugs such as ticks can transmit diseases such as malaria, lymphatic filariasis, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, Lyme disease and encephalitis. Over the past year, WHO has spearheaded a reprioritization of vector control, resulting in the Global Vector Control Response (GVCR) 2017–2030.