Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System (VMNIS)

Micronutrients database

The Micronutrients Database was first developed as part of the Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System, formerly known as the Micronutrient Deficiency Information System, in 1991. After a thorough evaluation of the database from the epidemiologic and public health informatics perspectives[1], the database has been upgraded and expanded to include 40 indicators of the status of 17 micronutrients or micronutrient-related conditions, covering both deficiency and excess.

The Micronutrients Database is an interactive platform for summarizing data published in reports and manuscripts on the micronutrient status of populations representative at the national, regional (within country) and first administrative level (e.g. canton, state, province).

The objectives of this database are to:

  • Systematically retrieve and summarize data on vitamin and mineral status of populations.
  • Provide Member States and their partners with up-to-date national, regional, and global assessments of the magnitude of micronutrient deficiencies.
  • Track progress made towards the goal of elimination of the major micronutrient deficiencies adopted by the international community.
  • Monitor and evaluate, through systematic data collection over time, the impact of WHO strategies to prevent and control micronutrient malnutrition.
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    In this pilot version of the Micronutrients Database, users may download data on the micronutrient status of populations and create maps of the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies.

In the future, features that allow users to create graphs and country profiles of the micronutrient status of populations will be added.

Accurate and timely data are an essential resource for Member States to achieve targets for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and goals for universal health care, health emergencies and healthier populations. WHO is the steward and custodian for monitoring the health-related SDGs[2]. Data are needed to measure performance, improve programme decisions and increase accountability. WHO’s Constitution requests Member States to submit annual reports on health status and actions taken to improve health[3]. WHO plays a critical role in supporting Member States in the effective collection, analysis, reporting and use of data.

We encourage Member States and researchers to contribute their micronutrient status data to the Micronutrients Database. If you are aware of data not already in the database, representative at the national, regional (within country) or first administrative level (e.g. canton, state, province), we encourage you to send the published survey report or manuscript to nutrition@who.int.

Acknowledgements

The Micronutrients Database is maintained by the Evidence and Programme Guidance Unit of the WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development. WHO thanks the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s International Micronutrient Malnutrition Prevention and Control Program (IMMPaCt), the CDC National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Nutrition International (NI) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for their technical and financial support in the upgrade and expansion of this database.

WHO also acknowledges the hard work and collaboration of many individuals, institutions, governments, nongovernmental, and international organizations to keep VMNIS information up to date. Special thanks are due to ministries of health of the WHO Member States, WHO regional offices, WHO country offices and partner organizations.

Disclaimer

This is a pilot version of the WHO Micronutrients Database. This version only allows users to download data on the micronutrient status of populations and to create maps of the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies. Data have been included in the database from as early as 1968 to the present. We are still in the process of adding survey data into this new database platform, with priority being given to surveys conducted from the year 2000 to present. Additional database features, such as country profiles, are being developed, and new data are continuously being added. If additional information on survey data collected prior to the year 2000 is needed, please contact WHO at nutrition@who.int.


[1] Aburto NJ, Rogers L, De-Regil LM, Kuruchittham V, Rob G, Arif R, Peña-Rosas JP An evaluation of a global vitamin and mineral nutrition surveillance system. Arch Latinoam Nutr. 2013 Jun;63(2):105-13. Available at: http://www.alanrevista.org/ediciones/2013/2/?i=art1 /
[2] http://www.who.int/about/what-we-do/gpw13-expert-group/Draft-GPW13-Advance-Edited-5Jan2018.pdf
[3] WHO Constitution Articles 61-65 (http://apps.who.int/gb/bd/PDF/bd48/basic-documents-48th-edition-en.pdf#page=1.

http://www.who.int/vmnis/contact/en/index.html

Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System
Evidence and Programme Guidance Unit
Nutrition for Health and Development
World Health Organization
20, Avenue Appia
CH-1211 Geneva 27
Switzerland

Fax: +41 22 791 41 56
E-mail: nutrition@who.int