Nepal

The United Nation's Human Development Report 2010 included Nepal in a list of 10 nations making the fastest development gains in terms of the Human Development Index over the last 4 decades. Despite this, evidence points to a chronic shortage in HRH in most cadres, especially doctors, nurses, and midwives (the density is 7 per 10,000 population) (WHO Global Atlas of the Health Workforce, 2010). Health care specialists prefer to join private institutions in urban settings or migrate to developed countries. Health workers with the least experience generally choose air-linked, remote districts to be quickly eligible to practice medicine (CCF Case Study: Nepal: Strengthening Interrelationships between Stakeholders (the Alliance, 2011).

HRH challenges that persist include:

  • Poor staff performance in terms of productivity, quality, availability, and competency;
  • Fragmented approach to HRH planning, management, and development;
  • Imbalance between supply and demand, and narrow skill mix;
  • Limited HRH financing;
  • Low attraction / retention in public service, and “brain drain” largely due to the migration of health workers (Nepal: Towards building a comprehensive and costed HRH plan through the CCF process in Nepal, 2010).

The currently instituted HRH strategic plan (2003-2017) has not been sufficient to cope with these challenges. However, with the catalytic support of the Alliance from GIZ grant, Nepal’s Ministry of Health and Population has been successful in involving key stakeholders in creating a new, costed HRH strategic plan. Other partners such as WHO and DFID are also supporting the country.

Country Coordination and Facilitation (CCF) in Afghanistan:

CCF phases’ description and recommendations

Click on graph to read more about the CCF phases

Nepal has completed Phases 1 (HRH coordination mechanism) and 2 (HRH situation analysis) of the CCF process and is currently completing Phase 3 (HRH plan development). The following stakeholder categories are represented on Nepal’s CCF HRH Committee:

  • Public Health Sector (Ministry of Health and Population, Department of Health Services, Department of Drug Administration, and Department of Ayurveda)
  • Training institutions and training centers
  • Health workers’ associations
  • Professional research councils
  • Universities /academia /research centers
  • Civil society representatives
  • International organizations (GHWA, WHO, EDPs, DFID, and others)
  • Private sector
  • NGOs
  • Faith-based organizations
  • A wide variety of other government sectors and constitutional bodies.

An evidence based, comprehensive, and costed HRH strategic plan has been prepared, and obtained validation by the multi-stakeholder CCF Committee in January 2012. The final approval by the cabinet is still pending. The HRH strategic plan is based upon the following four outputs:

  • Appropriate supply of health workers for labour market needs
  • Equitable distribution of health workers
  • Improved health workforce performance
  • Effective and coordinated HRH planning, management and development across the health sector

HEALTH WORKFORCE DATA

HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH PLAN

HEALTH SECTOR STRATEGIES / PLANS

COUNTRY CASE STUDIES AND OTHER DOCUMENTS


ALLIANCE MEMBERS WORKING IN NEPAL

Share

KAMPALA DECLARATION AND AGENDA FOR GLOBAL ACTION PROGRESS

KD/AGA Progress Graph Nepal

COUNTRY MAP:

STATISTICS:

Total population: 29,331,000
Gross national income per capita (PPP international $): 1,120
Life expectancy at birth m/f (years): 65/69

SEND US YOUR FEEDBACK:

All reasonable precautions have been taken by the Alliance to verify the information contained on this web page. Notwithstanding, the Secretariat of the Alliance welcomes any comments, suggestions and notifications of errors or inconsistencies, which can be submitted using the form above.