Nutrition

Sugars intake for adult and children

A sugar lump on a spoon
WHO/Christopher Black

4 March 2015 -- We are pleased to announce the release of the WHO guideline on sugars intake for adults and children. The new guideline confirms that adults and children should maintain a reduced intake of free sugars over the life course and recommends that free sugars intake be reduced to less than 10% of total energy intake. The guideline further suggests that intake be reduced to less than 5% of total energy intake as a conditional recommendation, which means that policy-making will require substantial debate and involvement of various stakeholders for translating it into action.

Breastfeeding advocacy initiative

breastfeeding advocacy initiative buffet picture
UNICEF/NYHQ2005-1225/LeMoyne

19 February 2015 -- UNICEF and WHO, along with a range of partners, have formed a global advocacy initiative to increase political commitment to and investment for breastfeeding as the cornerstone of child nutrition, health and development.

Delayed umbilical cord clamping for improved maternal and infant health and nutrition outcomes

buffet cover for the Delayed umbilical cord clamping
WHO/NHD

19 January 2015 -- The guideline is intended for a wide audience, including policy-makers; their expert advisers; technical and programme staff at organizations involved in the design, implementation and scaling-up of nutrition actions for public health; and health staff providing care to mothers and their infants.

Effect and safety of salt iodization to prevent iodine deficiency disorders: A systematic review with meta-analyses

buffet cover effect and safety of salt iodization
WHO/NHD

16 January 2015 -- This systematic review and the corresponding meta-analyses provide the first comprehensive synthesis of available data comparing consumption of, or exposure to, iodized salt on an entire array of iodine deficiency disorders, including goitre, urinary iodine excretion, cretinism, cognitive function and potential adverse effects such as hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.

Highlights


Click on any of the following links to see the corresponding list of nutrition publications: